Jennifer Letchet Paintings

My work explores fundamental elements of painting, the relationship between colour and line. I intend my paintings to affect the viewer optically with the illusion of shapes moving and receding. Colour theory is very important to my work. I use specific hues to symbolise ideas or emotions. The contained shapes on canvases seem more like objects than lines. My recent work explores natural and man-made disasters and the impact this has on our environment. I want to record the changing landscape through simplified shapes and colours.

Monday, 31 January 2011

Wimbledon MA Interim Show

Click for large poster


Wimbledon MA Interim Show:
Futura Bold / Futura Oblique

Curated by Juan Bolivar / Julia Alvarez

Part 1 - Fri 4th March - Sun 6th March
Part 2 - Fri 11th March - Sun 13th March
Open Fri to Sun 1 - 5pm every week.

Private Views:
Part 1 - Thu 3rd March 630 - 9pm
Part 2 - Thu 10th March, 630 - 9pm

The Nunnery
183 Bow Road, London E3 25J

Tube - Bow Road (District Line)
DLR - Bow Church
Bus - 8, 25, 108, S2 & D8

Midterm Assessment Work

This is what my work looked like for the assessment.  I showed an older piece, Catalogue of Shapes (November 2010), an installation drawing which details shapes I have collected and drawn from satellite imagery.  The images have been numbered and there is a corresponding list of the islands' names.  The islands are not made up, they exist in reality, but their names are not typical of islands and suggest other narratives.  I like this essence of confusion, of interpretation.  This is the list of the islands:



1. Hestur
2. Litla Dimun
3. Suouroy
4. Fugloy
5. Gjogv
6. Skuvoy
7. Nolsoy
8. Stora Dimun
9. Mykines
10. Kirkjubour
11. Esturoy
12. Sandoy
13. Svinoy
14. Botyoy
15. Kunoy
16. Nolsoy (Detail)
17. Kalsoy
18. Vagur
19. Viyoy
20. Botyoy (Detail)
21. Stremoy
22. Svalbard
23. Inner and Outer Hebrides
24. St. Kilado
25. Fernando de Norinha
26. Philippines: Mindoro
27. Singo del Norte
28. Samar
29. Catanduares
30. Belcher
31. Prince Patrick
32. Ellef Ringres
33. Melville
34. Victoria
35. Baffin
36. King Christian
37. Axel Heiberg
38. Bylot
39. Coats
40. Somerset
41. Banks
42. Bathurst
43. Prince of Wales
44. King William
45. Ellel Ringres
46. Byam Martin
47. Southampton
48. Losap
49. Etal
50. Satalian Atoll
51. Dahlak

The second piece is a 9 part drawing, which is meant to be part of a whole.  This drawing is titled Possibility (January 2011) and is based on the random selection of numbers (through throwing a die 100 times for each canvas).  The idea is that through this process I have systematically designed a pure form which is like no other.  The canvases are read from left to right, with Part I having no co-ordinates i.e. no die was thrown, therefore no co-ordinates were set, and no line was drawn.  This shows of the shape being dependent on numbers.  The numbers (co-ordinates) were displayed to the left of the piece.  The idea behind this was to have the code, there was the possibility you could decipher it.  However, I set myself rules to ensure I did not intuitively draw.  Its like algebra, I gave the viewer only 2 of the 3 parts of the puzzle:
x + y = z (or code + rules = form)



















This is the code for the wall based drawing:



Part I

Part II:
1,15 10,4 18,10 11,19 6,10 6,5
9,15 12,18 15,18 5,12        12,14 15,3
15,11 13,18 8,18        19,15        10,5 14,2
5,11 8,16 14,5        4,19        14,4 9,11
17,18 6,17 4,11        2,16        7,4 6,11
15,20 10,15 6,13        6,18        4,11 15,17
15,20 18,4 2,14       12,18        1,13 14,16
2,15 17,13 8,17       15,2       12,17 3,20
10,9 5,18

Part III:
9,15 4,10 3,16 14,14 10,9 19,10
18,5 10,17 17,10 8,20         2,4 20,17
17,15 6,16 6,19 6,20         2,1 8,18
15,17 6,6 6,13 11,8        10,16 5,2
12,19 11,1 9,10 7,5        13,4 17,7
7,16 16,9 12,8 10,12        15,12 8,20
18,4 16,13 11,15 5,18        11,14 6,1
13,15 10,16 1,8 10,10 7,3 19,17
6,19 4,11

Part IV:
9,4 3,1 13,12 19,2 16,2 15,18
11,8 3,7 12,9 12,2 19,15 3,11
1,8 2,14 6,12 16,14 6,6 17,15
8,19 10,10 18,8 1,5 10,11 15,5
2,16 3,18 8,11 2,5 6,11 16,11
16,7 15,12 1,15 9,11 18,8 11,8
10,11 19,11 7,8 9,2 20,12 9,18
16,4 17,6 20,6 11,16 18,15 14,5
2,3

Part V:
18,20 13,15 18,7 11,10 10,2 9,18
15,10 20,5 7,19 15,12 8,10 9,4
10,13 9,16 11,15 16,14 20,11 6,5
16,9 19,12 1,15 6,5 4,1 12,9
4,1 3,19 5,2 16,9 16,3 19,20
9,16 16,19 8,9 10,2 3,16 5,16
11,6 4,3 4,9 9,9 4,5 9,9
11,19 10,16 10,7 4,14 12,6 20,6

Part VI:
6,2 12,20 3,16 4,17 18,3 4,20
6,1 19,5 6,8 10,17 17,15 2,3
14,5 17,17 18,14 3,18 15,9 11,14
14,11 12,8 9,1 5,15 16,3 10,12
5,12 14,3 512 4,3 6,17 13,16
9,16 11,14 9,19 7,5 12,14 11,18
9,8 18,3 13,13 15,6 4,7 6,17
16,5 17,2 15,8 5,3 5,6 18,12
12,1 12,7

Part VII:
11,14 7,11 6,3 13,8 12,8 7,15
8,9 7,20 18,9 3,13 14,1 15,10
3,14 19,19 3,2 18,1 4,5 12,8
17,1 11,17 4,11 11,7 3,15 17,5
10,4 7,3 3,3 6,20 10,14 9,3
10,20 9,17 15,12 3,10 10,20 18,20
7,11 3,11 14,16 9,12 3,5 13,14
16,5 15,1 8,18 17,7 1,20 20,10
2,4 6,17

Part VIII:
17,9 3,2 8,4 1,12 9,3 17,16
19,3 7,7 5,16 6,15 2,7 11,19
16,14 15,15 1,13 12,10 6,12 4,8
9,15 12,2 20,10 17,12 13,20 17,11
10,15 15,20 11,16 19,6 7,16 17,3
2,11 4,4 13,15 9,6

Part IX:
18,19 12,4 19,2 18,3 14,7 6,14
5,8 18,8 7,17 4,14 16,15 8,10
1,13 20,13 7,4 13,20 11,15 6,15
20,10 1,7 20,15 6,9 12,20 8,8
7,15 16,17 5,13 8,14 19,11 5,11
8,10 14,9 11,5 8,19 4,10 2,3
17,2 20,12 4,14 13,10 7,4 8,16
2,7 16,17 10,4




Student Crit 28/01/2011

After the assessment last week, we had a student led crit.  The assessment had ben a peer review, so we wanted to take advantage of everything we had discussed.  While the space still looked like an exhibition rather than a studio, we thought it prudent to analyze what had been created at this point.  I found this a valuable exercise, although not a completely positive one.

Firstly, I gathered that my work is still being misread.  This I found very disheartening.  I had abandoned islands to form my own shapes.  Yet, somehow my work is till being read in connection with islands.  Is this because they have knowledge of my former work clouding their opinions, or does my new work still suggest topography?

The black and white drawn lines, and the angularity of the grid; everything feels geometric and alien.  However, perhaps the grid feels too much like mapping lines.  I think its time to get rid of the grid, and remove the work as far from islands as possible.  I am going to take the work into colour.  I am going to give myself a deadline for this project: 2 weeks and then I will abandon it or continue depending on the outcome.  One thing I do know for certain: I want rid of the islands.  I want change.

Monday, 24 January 2011

Shape Series: Shape I, Shape II, Shape III & Shape IV

The shape series comprises of 4 canvases each with one shape designed from a set of 50 co-ordinates taken from random dice throwing using a 20-sided die.

Shape II, Shape III & Shape IV all experiment with the same shape taken from the same co-ordinates.  In these three paintings I have experimented with how to deal with my shape; whether I should paint or shade with pencil.  I also wanted to experiment with whether I should varnish them or not, to bring them back into the context of painting. 

All of the 4 Shapes have been created on canvas, which has been primed white and then sanded down to create a smooth surface.  I have then created a grid using a 4H pencil to replicate graph paper (1 cm squares).  I did this for two reasons; firstly I wanted to reference mathematics, order and numbers, and secondly it was a practical need to enable me to plot co-ordinates.

Shape I is essentially a resolved piece worked out from the others in the series.  It has been simply filled in with graphite to refer back to the process of drawing, reiterate the importance of line and not to detract from the importance of numbers, chance and random acts.  This work is about designing pure shape from numbers.  I have set myself rules to limit the actions I can take in the drawing process.

The others in the series convey the experimentation: Shape II has also been simply shaded, Shape III has been shaded along the contour and Shape IV has been painted flatly in black oils.  Shape III failed as the illusion of three-dimensionality detracted from the process of drawing.  Shape IV felt too harsh, the blackness consumed the piece.  I could only focus, as a viewer, on the paint and the colour rather than the piece as a drawing.

Please see the below images of the series.

Monday, 17 January 2011

Possibility

I am currently drawing out my 'final' piece as such for my midterm assessment.  This piece comprises of nine square canvases measuring 35 x 35 cm each and with eight codes.  The eight series of numbers, one for each canvas, are then linked together by the drawing, i.e. like a dot-to-dot picture.  I referencing game playing with the series of nine which look like one of those slide puzzles, dot-to-dot and secret codes.  The code itself is a set of coordinates.  50 coordinates per square; the coordinates determined by throwing two 20 sided dice (from a specific game itself).  These plots have been used to create a shape which is self-referential, unlike any seen in nature, something determined by a set of rules and not by any emotional pull or by the subconscious.  The numbers create a purely random shape, a designed island full of hard lines which is completely unnatural.  However, the shapes are bound by numbers and aren't numbers intrinsic to nature and reality?

Documentation of my work (October 2010 - January 2011)

I spent most of Friday getting ready for my forthcoming midterm assessment.  I used the photography studio to document my work.  Here are the finished pieces I have created in the last four months.  I think you can see development and definitely some experimentation.

Shape I, graphite, damar and acrylic on canvas, 60 x 80 cm, December 2010

Made up Archipelago, oils and damar varnish on canvas, 78 x 104 cm, November 2010

Shape II, graphite, damar varnish and acrylic on canvas, 35 x 35 cm, January 2010

Shape III, graphite, damar varnish and acrylic on canvas, 35 x 35 cm, December 2010

Shape IV, graphite, oils and acrylic on canvas, 35 x 35 cm, December 2010

Faeroe, intaglio print, 32 x 42 cm, October 2010

Collection of Faeroes 1/18 (detail), oils and damar varnish on canvas, 12.4 x 14.2 cm, December 2010

Collection of Faeroes 2/18 (detail), oils and damar varnish on canvas, 12.4 x 14.2 cm, December 2010

Made up World, graphite on paper, 64 x 92 cm, October 2010

Faeroe II, intaglio print, 35 x 49 cm, October 2010

Faeroe III, Screen-print, 29 x 42 cm, November 2010

Svalbard, intaglio print, 25 x 35, October 2010

Mortlock I, intaglio print, 25 x 35 cm, November 2010

Mortlock II, intaglio print, 25 x 35 cm, November 2010

Order of the Faeroes, graphite on paper, 18 drawings measuring 29 x 43 cm each, October 2010

Order of the Faeroes (detail)

Order of the Faeroes (detail)

Colour swatches, oil on card, 7 x 10 cm each, used in the process of painting

Divide and Separate, graphite on paper, 200 x 300 cm, October 2010

Tate Britain 09/01/2011

I went to Tate Britain last week, easily my favourite gallery.  They are in the process of rejigging the space and the collection, and so new pieces were on display.  I found a new artist, Marc Vaux, who makes some intriguing paintings about colour and line.  They are vast abstract canvases with about two or three hues forming the composition.  I also saw a painting by Bridget Riley, Michael Craig-Martin's work and a room dedicated to Damian Hirst which was brilliant.  All of which will be very valuable to my research.  See the below photographs of what inspired me.


Damian Hirst

Peter Doig

Bridget Riley

Michael Craig-Martin

Marc Vaux

Marc Vaux


Marc Vaux


Damian Hirst (detail)

Damian Hirst

Thursday, 13 January 2011

Saatchi Gallery 01/01/2011

Here are a few snippets of what I found interesting at the Saatchi recently, in the second phase of his collection.